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20131210
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what do you see as the difference between how the bush administration and the obama administration approach the war on terror. >> right. , i mean, i think first of all it's great to be with you here on c-span and booktv. the bush with administration, i don't want to understate how atrocious i think that period was in american foreign policy. it really was like murder incorporated. the destruction of iraq, the creation of the cia black sites, the idea that the geneva convention was -- [inaudible] the abu ghraib torture, using guantanamo, you could go on and on in characterizing it. so i don't want to get into a thing about is obama worse than bush. i covered those wars, i know what happened. under president obama i think what we have is someone who has sort of rebranded some of the more egregious aspects of the bush-cheney counterterror apparatus and i think has convinced himself that they're waging a smarter war. so they're relying on the drones much more than the bush administration did, using small team of coovert operators to conduct either kill or capture, and because guantanam
of the end from the white house, president obama will focus on the benefits of the health care law he will be flying by the white house says have benefited from the overhaul. he will remind american fork discrimination against those with preexisting conditions. we'll have coverage of that at the white house later today in our commitment network, c-span 3. house judiciary committee waiting to gavel in. we stay here live on cease and two. -- c-span2. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> which is now congressman john conyers of michigan come into the hearing room. the rayburn house office building. he is the ranking member on the house judiciary committee. they are about to hold a hearing like in a president obama's use of executive power. looking at the constitutionality of the administration decisions, including the decision to delay the
and that is president barack obama. you have had dinner with president obama several times, as a group of historians someone to talk with them. you have an impression on him. in ted kennedy and obama in terms of leadership style and temperament. >> first off, what i would say is that if it weren't for kennedy i don't know that obama ever would've made it to the white house. because kennedy broke the hold of the white promise to males on the office. he opened the way to the idea that it should be a much broader group that can think about running for the office. and when we see a woman as president in the not-too-distant future -- not lobbying for anybody now, but -- [laughter] >> nonpartisan. >> that's why i said that. but we will see what was so and at some point we may see an asian american, maybe a hispanic, you see. but i think obama's presence in their innocence can be traced back to kennedy. obama is quite interesting in kennedy and he's quite interested in history of the presidency. we've had four dinners with them, and that the first dinner he wanted to talk about how other presidents had ach
related statements be printed in the record and that president obama be immediately notified of the senate's action and the senate then resume legislative session. the presiding officer: is there objection? a senator: reserving the right to object. the presiding officer: the senator from tennessee. mr. alexander: and i will make my remarks on this matter after the majority leader has completed his -- his business today. but i would note that on the last day we were here, november 21, there were only 16 nominations on the executive calendar who had been there more than three weeks. only eight more more than nine weeks. the republicans were ready to confirm more than 40 who had been there just a few weeks. and the democratic majority changed the rules of the senate in airwa a way that creates a se without rules. so until i understand better how a united states senator is supposed to operate in a senate without rules, i object. the presiding officer: objection is heard. mr. reid: madam president, i am not going to respond in any detail to my friend -- and he is my friend. there is no way, the
there at the front because they want to shock me -- >> host: is it about obama? >> guest: a lot about obama. it's not obama specifically if they generalized like how they are invading, if they are taking what's ours. >> host: interestingly in visiting my brother i feel like the bellagio has exploded. i haven't heard it so much in a while and all of a sudden it's like a barbecue like where did this come from? it's just like all over new york -- >> guest: i hung out at a bar not far from my house and the new york city fire department and so i heard that -- i heard a little bit about that but i haven't gone back and listened to it around the mixed race marriage and -- >> host: it's like really we are going to talk about this for how long? >> guest: that was fun because remember these guys know i'm not one of them. i make it clear. i'm not going to try to pretend -- >> host: are they self-conscious about racism or not even? >> guest: that's the thing. it is utterly self-conscious. there is no -- there's the occasional, but there's never a sense of sexism because they are also proclaiming the shell
'll hear about the relationship between president obama's cabinet and his closest ally. the cover story in the new "politico" magazine. susan is the editor and editor in chief john harris are with us today to talk about it. let me begin with you. why did you decide to launch a magazine? >> "politico" -- first i thank you. i'm happy to be here to talk about the project. everyone is very excited about the content and we're excited about susan the distinguished career as washington editor. we're excited to have her on the team. the reason we launched the mag diseent consistent with the larger mission. "politico" is about to turn 7 years old. we've had as our mission for sometime we want to be washington's dominant news room for coverage of national politics and policy making here in washington we want to be the dominant player in that. it's a vigorous competition day in day out. in order win the competition we need to do a lot of things well. historically when "politico" got started back then when we were an organ
and neighborhood partnership talks about the devotional e-mails he has been sending since barack obama since he was a senator. this is about half an hour. [applause] >> it is great to be here. change in plans, i wasn't able to update the book but cooking dishes for michele obama since this evening. american grow. we can get to that after the devotional. thank you for being here. so wonderful to see so many friends, old and new. like a family reunion. i am excited to share it this book with you. my wonderful wife, michele. [applause] >> we have been married precisely 82 days. you see this blow on my face, that is why. thank you so much for being here. when i started working for barack obama i had no idea i would be sending in a devotional every morning. i was a young kid from nashville, tenn. working on the 2008 campaign, in the senate office for couple years but didn't know him that well. i was doing out reach around a company like so many others including many folks that i see and privately i would pray for that young senator, that he would wake up every day and have a sense of purpose and the
months after i diseased to -- decided to move forward with writing the book, president obama asked me to take on another full-time job in chairing the democratic national committee, and i felt like in order to really do the book justice and do my job justice, coming out with a policy book during the presidential campaign probably wasn't the best idea, so we pushed the book forward a year. and writing and came out in october. >> by the time this book is published you write i hope we will look back on the health care reform and debt ceiling and knowledge it was rock bottom. i don't want to imagine how it would get worse. >> well, just when you thought it could not get worse, we end up having the republicans and tea party stopping the government to stop people from getting quality, affordable health care. >> who is the next generation? >> that is our children. i wrote thigs through the lens f being mother. even though politicians talk about the next generation, it isn't abstract concepts for me. i have one in the back of my car. i wrote the book to say we have to measure the success by h
of these people of course saw the cartoons as well. >> you can see george bush and margaret thatcher, rock obama candidacy is you sending them all off? >> the pen is mightier than the sword i say. >> here is a cover that you did. think big mr. president and also something on the debate. where do you come up with the concept of drawing like this quick. >> i've done 140 covers for the economy seemed about 4,000 cartoons, so there is a little different process for those. the cover i'm working with the editors because they believe the story of the day they often call me on a monday and say we think we are doing something like this. and then when we sign off i have 36 hours to complete the whole project. when i do my political cartoons that iit is more like a column e it's my own idea on a story of the week ended the ninth coming in with the idea and i will present it to them. one of the things about being a political cartoonist, which i would like to think is different than all of my other journalistic colleagues is that i had to cover local cartoons, local and international. the world is my oyster.
and since then is barack obama 2008. that is not unnatural jumping off point but kennedy could use it to advance his ambition of. >> host: the book is jfk and the senate. [applause] thank you for that lovely introduction. and also for coming out on a school might. i know how hard it is to do that if you have kids or not. also for postdate this event i would like to make a quick plug if you have any changes in your pocket by a book to support your local independent bookstore.
things. what do you think he would make of president obama and the current health care moment if in. >> well, i'll go first. >> yeah. i would think that he would -- let's talk about the first four years -- that he would say that obama, he's invaded this presidential role that my father has said, you know, makes a great president. he hasn't used the power of the presidency and the executive office to get around this, you know, obviously, it's a terrible republican congress that is against everything he stands for, but he just, he's not the strong president that my father, you know -- >> right. >> -- believed in. >> i might differ a little with that because i think when you look back at his first term, he did pass the this health care act which is having a tremendous impact on the american society and one that presumably will work in the end once we can solve all the problems with the web site is going to be what he will be remembered for. i mean, that is in the great tradition of the new deal, lyndon johnson and his programs and civil rights. it's something that he didn't have to pur
is trying to take your guns, goes iepg doing this, obama's doing that, obamacare's terrible. i wanted to talk to them. they are the guys with the ideas, the leaflets, and so i went up to the one table, and i just sort of said, you know, if i pick up a pamphlet, it's yours, and, you know, but four guys around at the table talking, and, you know, they looked at me suspiciously, and they said, who are you? >> host: you sound like way you are. you sound like a new yorker; right? it's hard to hide. >> guest: right. i'm a new york -- i'm a brooklyn, you know, jewish sociologist; right? >> host: right. grg so, you know -- >> host: feminist. >> guest: pick two. >> host: exactly. >> caller: i'm not going to, like, take fake a accent and be one of them. >> host: could you do it if you tried? >> guest: i doubt it, actually, but i don't think i would try, but i -- so i said to them, who are you, and i said, well, actually, i'm an academic, i'm a researcher doing research on these organizations, these ideas, and trying to understand the guys about it, and i am studying men who believe this stuff,
four years obama has stated this presidential role that my father has said to make a great president. he has not use the power of the presidency or the executive office to get around to but the congress to be against everything he stands for but. >> i may differ but if you look at his first term he passed the health care act that is having a tremendous impact on american society and then if we could solve the problems with the web site will be what he will be remembered for. :did johnson isn't he could have if he dismissed it and to focus on the job situation with the french industry. but then he did take advantage of that. just like and 1965 when he could pass this legislation for medicare and civil-rights. to get into the second term the house's children's republicans they cannot do very much. >> we probably have a slightly different take but what do you take is his assessment of the preparation obviously obamacare two office with the world collapsing around have. but president bush 43 said hank paulson of a bike to help you but i would do more harm than good but what frustrates pe
the administration took this action, president george w. bush secretary concord the obama administration to delay the mandate was wise. that was based on his experience in phasing in the medicare part d. prescription drug benefit. i have to say hyperventilating about an extraordinary and unprecedented constitutional these delays are is just that. it's contrary to the obvious historical fact. nor is the delay of the employer mandate on the front of the constitution. the framers could have prescribed to m believe that the president execute so why do they have faithfully and take care and i would have to disagree with professor rosenkranz and turley about their explanation of this in the original meaning of the clause. they were taking pains to clarify the president's duty is to implement the law in good faith and to exercise reasonable care with the word take care in doing so. the fact is that scholars on both left and right can' concors broadly worded phase to handle with fidelity to all including indeed the constitution. as a legal and practical matter, the president's phase in of the employer ma
. >> thank you very much. how many republicans voted for obama here? >> nobody's going to admit that. >> stand up. stand up. show yourself proudly. [applause] i didn't know anyone did that anymore. >> he used to ask that questions how many democrats and how many republicans? how many republicans voted for obama? me, a change. now they go to know. >> it's interesting because the republicans who voted for obama and the republican party itself there seems to be a lot of confusion and a lot of dissatisfaction and discouragement. you wrote this book for a number of reasons but my question is did you plan the timing of this book? >> yes i did. i'm going to drop this thing right before the republican party shinki in d.c. takes the beer truck strayed over the cliff with a government shutdown that will drive their numbers to an all-time low. then i started thinking if it's at an all-time low no one will believe that the republicans can come back to power. at least we have a reason for hope. the timing has been. >> it's unbelievable because when you read it you will see it's exactly, it fills
in the current presidency an eye and i by the way think it was entirely appropriate the president obama did not go to gettysburg. because i think that there is almost nothing in his current pattern which would be worthy of being near abraham lincoln. [applause] [applause] and i do not want to be partisan. but i do believe that it is important to look at contacts. lincoln was all about the rule of law and he understood as someone who had grown up poor, who had only had about a year and a half of schooling and had learned how to read by the light of a fireplace because his family could not afford candles. he understood that it is the rule of law that protects the weak and the average person in them without this it is the predators and the vicious and the powerful. and so he saw what we were fighting over is the very essence of freedom and whether or not that freedom would survive. and he goes to gettysburg, this would have gotten much longer and much bloodier and much more difficult than he could imagine or that anyone expected. everyone thought it was a 30 day to 90 day war. and lincoln is h
. and for the last half decade, this week is the fifth anniversary of the winning of the president i by barack obama -- presidency by barack obama. barack obama and the rise of a new kind, a new, more ambitious and i might even say radical kind of american liberalism. regarding the '80s, i think the one column that sort of captures it the best is the one in which bill clinton says during his presidency when we look back on that era -- he meant the cold war era -- and and we long for a, i made a crack the other day. i said, gosh, i miss the cold war. it was a joke. i mean, i didn't want really miss it, but you get the joke. and the point was that we had this myth created after conservativism in the decade over the '80s, utterly destroyed and undid what was left of the soviet empire of commune ill. this myth -- communism. this myth that there was a great national consensus on how to confront the soviets. now, there was in the '50s and the '60s, but it dissolved after the vietnam era. and there was a great division in the country. and the '80s were distinguished by the fact that there was a total break
of barack obama's first term. at that time, people didn't understand that obama continued bush's policy. the surveillance and everything we were doing domestically. and so linda greenhouse referred my book to the wake-up call. people didn't wake up that much. people were not looking to re-examine the decisions that had been made in the fall of 2001 about what our antiterrorism strategies should be. so what i would say is there was a snooze alarm. and the wake-up call came with snowden. when he started releasing documents about what actually is going on behind the curtain and what kind of surveillance there is, i think people did start to pay more attention. i think for good reason. and so, well, i'll tell you i think it matters more than ever people be aware of what is going on and what is happening politically. there's pending in congress right now a bill both a u.s. aid freedom pact. i wonder how many of your viewers know the u.s. aid pact rate act was an ak anymore. if you visualize the letter stand for the name of the bill. which is uniting and strengthening america by providing app
guns and obama's doing this and that and obamacare's terrible. those were the guys i wanted to talk to. i said is this your stuff, and they said, yeah, who are you? i said, actually, i'm an academic, i'm a researcher, and i'm doing research on, you know, these organizations, these ideas and trying to to understand the guise of it and actually studying men who believe this stuff. and they, you know, a bunch of them looked at me suspiciously and sort of asked me questions, and i just said, look, here's what i am, you know? i don't get it. so -- but here's my job, i want to understand how you guys see the world. i want to understand your world view. look, you will not convince me, and i will not convince you. that's off the table. what is on the table is i want to understand why you think the way you do. >> downward mobility, racial and gender equality. michael kimmel on the fears,ening psities and rage of angry white men tonight at 9 on "after words," part of book thf this weekend on c-span2. >> and online for december's booktv book club, we want to know what your favorite weeks were --
standpoint. because whether it's obama, and whether it's war powers act, whether it's getting into iraq, these are all issues are deeply concerned about. so you criticized and, you know, you've made some i think remarks concerning, i don't think you take some of this seriously of what your colleagues have to say up there. so give me an answer as to what you think we need to do to get, to curtail the executive power the way i think it's been used over the years. >> you may answer the question quickly. >> quickly spin well, i think you can pass legislation to overturn an executive action to disapprove the. you can withhold funds for it speeded let me ask you. you are not reciting, 94% of obamacare is mandatory spending. and the democrats pass that in italy without any motion from the public. nothing to be done about that at this point. it's the law. i yield back. >> thank the gentleman from pennsylvania. the chair will not recognize the gentleman from new york, my friend, mr. jeffries. >> thank you, mr. chairman, as was ranking member, and the panelists for their participation this mornin
. something unprecedented has happened in the u.s. department of justice. when president obama was elected in 2008 and organized the department of justice in 2009, he created the most politicized part of justice we had at least since the nixon administration if not before hand. and this isn't just opinion. it's a sixpack. think about this for a second. the department of justice is an entity that is the signed to interpret and enforce the law. when president obama appointed the attorney general he appointed eric holder who had been the campaign chairman and anti-campaign bumbler a large dollar fundraiser for his election and for other senior fr spots at the department of justice also occupied by campaign bumbler's. that is unprecedented in american history. and during the last four years what you've seen in the department of justice is a centrally enforce the law in such a way as to where they go after the political opponents of the president and they lay off the political friends and supporters of the president. it's a centrally using the department of justice like the brick for this week
obama. on tuesday, he spoke at the national press club about his country's free trade agreement with the u.s., the war on drugs, and peace talks with columbian rebels. this is an hour. >>> good afternoon. welcome to the national press club. my name is angela keane. i'm a reporter for "bloomberg news" and the 106th president of the national press club. we are the world's leading professional organization for journalists committed to our profession's future through our programming with the event such as this, while fostering a free press worldwide. for more information about the national press club, please visit our website at www.press.org. to donate to programs offered to the public through the national press club journalism institute. on behalf of our members worldwide, i would like to welcome our speaker and those in the audience today. if you hear applause, i note that members of the general public are also attending. so it's not necessarily evidence of a lack of journalistic objectivity. i would like to welcome our c-span and public radio audiences. you can follow the action
. obama. >> guest: where do you live? >> caller: georgia. >> host: have you been to warm springs, georgia. >> host: yes. >> guest: i'm impressed. >> host: thank you so much for the call. it was about the campaign. >> guest: she felt badly. people remember it. you know, he lost his voice at the very end of the campaign, and it was left to the first lady, another first, i think, to read the concession statement and telegram of congratulations that had been sent to president-elect carter. at the same time, you know, she wouldn't miss life in politics. he had promised her long before watergate that they were going to retire in 1976. once he concluded he would not be speaker of the house, she had exacted a promise that after 1976, they would leave washington, go back to grand rapids, practice law, had no money, make a little bit of money for the kids and so on, and intervening events played havoc with that, but they left washington to go to another destination. >> host: we talked about the struggles with alcohol when he was in the house of representatives. here's what she wrote about this in t
i was a little bit confused when he said no one has accused president obama of being inclined to engage in a war without a declaration. i was in court with members of this committee saying exactly that in the conflict and what disturbed us is the white house came back and said the reason that we don't need a declaration of war is the president defines what it is and he's simply saying this isn't a war. when we talk about the danger this is a danger of a different kind. not only did a express language of the constitution, that this administration through these acts and through the large numbers of attacks is returning the world to a state of nature. we are taking dumb criminal international principles that have governed this world that respect the territorial limitations. i spoke to the nato parliamentarians and i told them you will blow the the day that you and force the position that they can take unilateral action when somebody vaporizes somebody in london. >> my time is about to run out three and let me give each of you this question. the president ordered and more a -- and
interestiinteresti ng thing that obama has said at a philosophical level in terms of -- the most interesting thing he said was a never realize that buying insurance was hard. i said at the time if you're 52 and you're just now learning that buying insurance is complicated, maybe you shouldn't have tried to redo the entire country. [applause] but he said two other things. this one press conference when he was clearly totally rattled, and it's almost painful -- the "washington post" put up six pictures of them with very different images of sorted between defeat, dismay, disillusioned and whatever the other words were. he said two other things at a personal level were passing. one was he said, he hadn't realized it would be more complicated to buy health insurance that it is going kayaking or ebay or amazon. the founders of google support supporting to the founders of facebook supported him. the id he didn't bring in a bunch of these guys sometimes two or three years ago and said, hi, how hardy thing will be to design a complex system which requires them to give you all their personal information so we
tuesday that in order to get a buy in from republicans, president obama endorsed adopted health care model first proposed by the heritage foundation. the individual mandate. he spoke at the forum hosted by georgetown university. here is a little of what he said. i had many conversations with him and others over those early stages. i'll never forget as he was contemplating what model he would use, there was a lot of pressure in his party going back to this question about government to say you know what, what we ought to have is a single-payer system. medicare for all. that's what we need. medicare for all. a single-payer system like a lot other industrialized countries especially europe. you know what his answer was? i'm going take the heritage foundation proposal they came up with in 1993 and we'll use that as the model and we'll use that as the basis for legislation. because i want to see if we can find it bipartisan. they said, okay, we'll accept that. when you offer the exchange there ought to be a public option. you ought to be able to go every state and pick medicare for all, if that'
] [inaudible conversations] >> president obama and former presidents carter, bush and clinton along with other world leaders will be in south africa tomorrow for a memorial service for nelson mandela. that bins at 4 a.m. eastern time. earlier today british prime minister david cameron and members of the british house of commons paid tribute to nelson mandela. here's some of the prime minister's statement. >> mandela was the embodiment of that struggle. he did not see himself as a helpless victim of history, he wrote it. we must never forget the evil of apartheid and its effect on everyday life. separate benches, separate buses, separate schools, even separate pews in church. interracial relationships criminalized, past laws and banning orders, a whole language of segregation that expressed man's inhumanity to man. nelson mandela's struggle was made ever more vital by acts of extreme brewalty on the part of the -- brutality on the part of the south african authorities. his was a journey that spanned six decades through nearly three decades of incarceration through to his negotiations that led t
of the republican party are determined not to give president obama a victory at any cost. and i'm just worried that this agreement will get caught up in that kind of politics. what is the role of congress has to play on this agreement? its not on the treaty. at some point i guess it will be a treaty. if that's not the case? >> i don't envision this is rarely having to be a treaty that congress is nevertheless the key because this is the difference between the european sanctions and the american sanctions created the europeans pass the executive branch is the 27 or 28 foreign ministers have a meeting and they sign onto it with a stroke of the pen sanctions are there and the sanctions are gone. none of the national legislators are involved in this process. anything that goes through the legislative process takes much more time and has flexibility and is by design created to take time to make sure there aren't any faster changes. the american sanctions or a spiders web according to the report. i think it was a very good formulation. it's very difficult to move one without moving all. and most imp
on nominations their top priority, president obama's second-term regulations on climate change, is likely to have a better shot at surviving challenges once obama's nominees are confirmed for the crucial u.s. court of appeals for the district of columbia." end quote. and "the washington post" wrote this -- quote -- "democrats say the shift in the court will be especially important given obama's legislative proposals have little chance to prevail in the g.o.p.-controlled house. the most contentious issue likely to face the appeals court are climate change regulations being pursued by the e.p.a. the measures represent obama's most ambitious effort to combat climate change in his second term. coal-fired power plants are the key source of carbon emissions, at a time when such proposals have no chance of passage in congress." end of quote from "the post." the same "washington post" article acknowledged the importance of removing the judicial check on obamacare -- quote -- "the court is expected to hear a series of other legal challenges as well, including lawsuits related to elements of the affordab
't care how many times or how hard ted cruz can hug barack obama, i don't think he could win the majority of the latino vote, the majority of the women vote, a fourth of the black vote in a blue state like new jersey. i want to win elections. that requires fielding candidates that can win. fielding candidates that fit the population needs, priorities of the places where they are running. a winning republican candidate with whom i agree part of the time is a hell of a lot better than a losing republican candidate with whom i agree all of the time. and because this is new hampshire, i want to make an aside here. kelly ayotte is a winning republican candidate. and she's an even better senator. she is thoughtful, she is courageous, she has brains, she has heart, she has guts. she worries about priorities in new hampshire, not republican primaries in new hampshire. and as ted cruz and the senate conservatives found out recently, do not tread on kelly ayotte. she bites back. if you ask me today what the biggest problem the party faces, i would say there are many issues. but the most harmful is
income. that is the 80th percentile nationally. the obama administration which i worked 10 extended the higher education tax benefits for -- markedly and i think that is then a laudable accomplishment but it also increased the income level at which people can get an american opportunity tax credit formerly hope all the way up to $80,000 away from the 80th percentile to the 95th percentile. why are we providing tax benefits and that some $7 billion a year to folks in the top income quintile. why is it that mitt romney -- i have three, 529's but why can mitt romney get tax benefits attached to it when he is students need of pell grants? closer to an attack site but i think there are others in the committee's jurisdiction. >> that is an interesting concept and we may follow up with you. the other is financial incentives to borrowers that have ffel loans to get them to convert their debt to a direct loan on that basis. have you worked out specifics as to how you think that program would work? >> actually the department of education administered a small similar program that allowed borro
deficits. the short-term deficits largely were inherited by the rock obama -- barack obama and we need to understand its short-term deficits are understandable because we are in a recession and we have to undeclared wars and a number of bailouts and unemployment is very high. so he made it very clear that he wants to try to take the steps to try to get the economy going on in consistent basis and bring unemployment down. he is going to propose a number of tax cuts or tax preferences as well as spending increases to try to do that and that may exacerbate the short-term but then he pivoted which i think is important to talk about the structural deficit. and that is what threatens the state. it's not the ice that is above the water. it's the ice that is below the water. it's not the debt on the balance sheet, it is what is off the balance sheet that disrupts the future and he talked about three things, he talked about freezing a portion of discretionary spending, less than 20% of the federal budget for three years. three years is better than one book, and you know, frankly it is a modest
is getting crazy even an irish tv and ireland. then after the shooting then it is barack obama who gives me the title of the book with the ninth talk but then he said "if i had a son" he would look like trayvon martin. that might america has two channels people looks like we and people who don't. george zimmerman was the obama supporter. and he took a black girl to the prom the first fiancee was hispanic. does not look like the sense of justice and thrown into the cold. then the media begin to corrupt the case in ways that are, call nbc starts it is a member he is wandering around in the rain? what is he wearing? he is wearing a dark hoodie sneakers jean dore sweatpants here is how nbc edited the exchange. here they said george zimmerman and the words on the screen. the guy looks like he is up to no good. he looks black and is wearing a hoodie. he ran this at least one dozen times. george zimmerman is suing them for $2 million as well they should. the audience does not know otherwise no reason to suspect that if you see that on the "today show" established why would they do something so fla
of it was unnecessary. as president obama has said, fighting to deliver quality, affordable health insurance and the security that comes with it to every american is paramount. this is about making sure that everyone in the united states gets a fair shake, and it's about the economic imperative as we continue to rebuild our economy and build a better bargain for the middle class. that's what the affordable care act does, by using touchtone american values of transparency and competition to improve health care protection, and affordability to those americans who already have insurance, and to provide new affordable care options for consumers who either don't have it or want to switch their insurance. we finally put in place real solutions that have been at work for generations, and we will continue for generations to come. now, reform and our health care system is not an easy task. i don't need to tell anybody in the room this or anyone who's read the newspapers the last few months. i will set worked on many competition issues to middle east peace, iran, budget deals. i can tell everybody in
the government's trying to take away guns, the government's doing this, and obama's doing that, and obamacare's terrible. so those were the guys i wanted to talk to because they were the guys with the leaflets, the ideas. so i said to them, you know -- [inaudible] and they said who are you, and i said, actually, i'm a researcher, and i'm doing research on these organizations, these ideas and trying to understand the guise about it, and i'm actually studying men who believe stuff. and they, you know, a bunch of them looked at me suspiciously and sort of asked me questions. and i just said, look, here's what i am, you know? i don't get it. so -- but here's my job, i want to understand how you guys see the world. i want to understand your world view. look, you will not convince me, and i will not convince you. that that's off the table. what is on the table is i want to understand why you think the way you do. >> downward mobility, racial and gender equality, michael kimmel on the fears, anxiety the fews and range of angry white men sunday night at 9 on "after words" part of booktv this weekend
. a senior administration official in the current obama administration told us last week, he said i've been incredibly impressed by the judgment and care that you would expect from a great news organization. and, finally, a senior whitehall official at the heart of these stories on september 9, i have not seen anything you have published to date which is risked lives. so there are different views about this and i listened with respect to the give you have given, but i don't -- >> but you disagree with an? >> it's not that i disagree. it's impossible to assess because no one is give me specific evidence. >> the real criticism is that the information you contains the names of individual sector the officers and this has been sent around the world, sometimes pay for by "the guardian," and these names are of our security officers, people who were there to protect our country. that's what you damaged the country, because others who don't have security clearance have been able to read these names, know who they are, possibly know where they live. that is the damage that they allege you have done.
is your day job? >> i led the white house faith-based initiative and president obama's first term and now i am a columnist for the daily beast and i run a social consulting company called value partnership. >> host: do you have a church? >> i attended congregation in washington dc. i was an associate professor in cambridge massachusetts. >> how did you get associated with the president and the faith-based initiative? >> guest: i started within early in 2,005 and started defending devotionals. i was a staffer doing outreach like a lot of other folks and i decided one day that in addition to policy advice he needs somebody thinking about his soul so i decided to send him an e-mail one day and i have no idea if he would respond if were we like it but he wrote me back and said this devotionals is exactly what i needed today. would you do it every day? that was six years ago and i have been sending them every day since. >> host: and what will we find? find?guest. >> 365 devotionals that help him start his day. in addition to that you'll find storieyou willfind stories of fe white house. presid
agreement from a year and a half ago. was there discussion today on with president obama how that's going and whether anything should change with it? >> yes. we came to conclusion that the free trade agreement is working quite well. the u.s. is exporting more to colombia and vice versa. there are some specific issues where we have mutual, not complaints, but mutual efforts to -- obstacles to overcome, and they mentioned something with the labor, some issues with the labor situation in colombia. we addressed the issues very clearly on what we are doing there. i wanted the u.s. to be more helpful in lifting obstacles that would allow us, for example, to export our avacoados to the u.s. because i was giving in the white house jew dish solid, the first plate in the lunch, and there was an avocado, and i said it's not clommian because we have restrictions. they need to be lifted. those types of items are the subject of the ones that we shared, but in general, we are very happy with the way they are performing. >> there's been concern about the protection of workers under the free trade agreeme
stimulate the economy and create jobs. also, this from the associate press, president obama ordering the federal government to nearly triple its use of renewable sources for electricity by 2020. the president said the government should lead by example. he also says plants use renewables for 20% of electricity will help reduce pollution, the cause of global warming, promote american energy independence and boost domestic energy sources such as solar and wind power to provide thousands of jobs. coming up at 1:15 eastern today here on c-span2, senate judiciary committee chair patrick leahy from vermont to talk about the obama administration's policy on human rights as was future congressional action. he will appear at the second annual human rights summit hosted by the group human rights first. >> friday on c-span "washington journal" looks at the mission and role of the national institutes of health. starting live at 730 am eastern. >> all with your calls and comments live on c-span. >> as you walk in the our tables out in front with lots of pamphlets, prior to entering the country. th
. >> any other questions? thanks for having me, everyone. [applause] president obama dropped into a washington dc bookstore saturday along with his daughters to do some holiday shopping. when he was asked by a reporter what he thought he said he had a long list of books for readers ages five to 52. press reports say the purchases included the kite runner, herald and the purple crayon and a sports team. earlier in the day he sent out a tweet about the importance of supporting small businesses. the saturday after thanksgiving has become known as small-business saturday. and although conversations what did you buy? >> it is a long list but some outstanding books. i've got a book for every age group from five until 52. okay. have a great holiday. [applause] this week fox and friends cohost brian kilmeade in george washington's secret six. the tv hosts told the story of a spy ring and six previously unknown revolutionary spies infiltrated the british ranks in new york and are credited with turning the tide of the war. this program is about an hour. >> host: this is a turkic and en
men. sunday night on 9:00 on "after words." back -- part of booktv on c-span2. >>> president obama said today that income inequality is, quote, the defining challenge of our time. to close the growing gap between the rich and poor in america he called for increase in minimum wage. the president's remarks came in a speech in the neighborhood of washington, d.c. [applause] >> good morning! good morning, everybody. thank you couch for being here. i want to thank you all for joining us. members of congress, members of the administration, mayor here as well as other mayors. i want to thank the arc for hosting us today. we are thrilled to have the president to discuss one of the gravest challenges of our time. raising inequality. we're particularly honored to do so as it separates the tebt anniversary this year. behind all the policy is a simple idea expanding opportunity for all americans. expanding the middle class is the best way to grow and grow stronger. i know, that principle is critical and not just for grant politician. it is mattered so much in my own life. i grew up in a suburb
the best, but when president obama said we shall not see his like again, i guess he was right on one level. but when you look at what he did, the fact that his words and his deeds moved mountains, actually, let's hope we do see his like again. and let's hope we see them in some parts of the world like the middle east or in the vicinity of the koreas or elsewhere where we're crying out for a quality of politician that can move mountains and move minds the way that he did. he does remind us that our -- [inaudible] isn't as bad and needn't be with as awful as often depicted, and he gives us something better to work for in ourselves. >> here, here. >> mr. frank dobson. >> mr. speaker, it's a great honor to take part in this tribute to nelson mandela. almost, as far as i'm concerned, a good a moment as the magic moment when i sat with my wife in westminster hall when he addressed both houses of our parliament as the democratically-elected president of all south africans. and i know i speak on behalf of the people in my constituency, holborn and st. pancras because they have a very special relat
all the democrats up for a big meeting with obama to tell them it is going to be okay. and hear their problem and say how can we make this better. >> on that subject of democrats offering solutions. several democrats seek -- seven -- president obama to appoint an official it oversee the ongoing repairs of the website after jeffrey zines steps down. talk about if he is going to be replaced by the whitehouse department >> he came in to take over and manage this process once they were aware of the wb site problems. he is the ring leader all of the fix and things that needed to be changed in the website. he is going to move to a different position. we are not sure when. he is scheduled to take over in january. the whitehouse is going to replace him and we are not sure who or by whom. but the democrats say they want a long-term permanent person in this position so we know who is accountable. he was put in as the man in charge and we need to know who is the next man in charge >> we are talking with emily ethridge of cq rollcall. >> tank you for taking my call. medicare has been around
trust obama like our intelligence but they were not sure they wanted to use our intelligence. that became an important issue, ultimately the combination of sanctions and i have to say, you look for allies in the principles committee and we were very well allied on this, very important but the indictments were also from the work crimes tribunal and that combination of aspects and the bombing, it is interesting, i admired general powell incredibly, arguing with him as difficult as a mere mortal female civilian. have to explain patiently to ambassador albright that our soldiers were not ploy soldiers and i called him after the book came out and you have to understand something. he send me his book and signed it with love, admiration, i wrote back a note and the love, admiration, forcefully, madeleine. charlie really had a different approach and as you said some of it was his background. he came from a different -- there was the time we were standing in front of the situation room, he in his uniform and me with my pen and bob rubin said force and diplomacy and charlie said which
acting deputy secretary of defense. i recommended christine to present obama because i felt we needed the continuity to continue with some of the most defining challenges that we had been facing and will continue to face in this department over a number of years. and you know what those are. it's budget, sequestration. we're finishing up qdr. review. and how all that impacts strategic interest and focus and where we go from here. she brings the continuity. she brings the expertise, the leadership. she has relationships. she is highly respected in the congress, in the white house, and certainly around here. so i want to acknowledge her coming over to give us some of her time. she thought a few months ago she was going to escape. she didn't. she will be an important part of how we go forward here the next few months, and have great confidence in her, and look forward to working with her again. i just spent some time with her this one as we laid out kind of the next steps year for the next few weeks. i also want to take an opportunity to thank ash carter. we had a going away ceremony on
, the united states, that is not the leadership i expect of my government. the clinton, bush, and obama administration is isolating the united states on this issue. i ask what kind of message is this sending the rest of the world in this lack of he leadership? we ought to sign it. we spend hundreds of millions of dollars removing the land mines and use the leahy funds to help land mine victims around the world. what are we afraid of? we have another law that says we cannot export land mines. let's so the courage. it only take as little bit to go for it and sign the treaty like every ally of ours has done. is that so difficult? let me tell you in conclusion. on november 22nd, remember the great loss this country suffered 50 years ago when kennedy was assassinated. i remember my wife being a young law student and watching the hundreds of thousands of people going down and it was so silent you could hear the drums when the band left and you can hear the lights in the street lights change. and i have been thinking about that a lot in the last few days. we have talked about it and what it fe
that in the article obama back down to benjamin netanyahu. and this is the same process that created this arrangement. and in the context of which i hope we don't lose our sense of rationality because a war in the middle east is going to make his expedition into afghanistan and iraq look like short-term lasting a dozen years or so. the united states for 30 years managed to prevent a nuclear war and they are able to convince both of those countries and the soviet union why we would have to go to war. and that would preserve their independence even if there is no solution with the iranians. the israelis have 200 or more and they are not one-sided we vulnerable and i am quite sure that we make a subsequent full-scale treaty with iran. >> and this would be preferable for military action. >> there's no reason to believe it wouldn't work if the united states was committed and was a proportion of power between the united states including nuclear power would be enormous and we have again been swept into this formulation and a quick -- to nuclear capability and once you have completed this, you have one nucle
s when he was running, so did not have the energy of richard nixon in 1960, or obama running in 2008 and so on. >> and mrs. eisenhower, a lot has been written about your parents' relationship with the eisenhowers. how do you describe it? >> i think that one of the things i enjoyed doing when i was working on the project of eisenhower's retirement years, was to look at that relationship and to think about it more, and i'm amazed that eisenhower and nixon got along as well as they did. you have two presidents, rumbling around together. a president is going to be someone who is very driven, as an agenda, device eighten hour, and richard nixon as 39 becomes his vice president, who already is showing signs he is on his way. so the fact they got along as well as they did is a testament to self things, but i think eisenhower should be praised because eisenhower made the vice-presidency significant. the sent my parents to 53 nations around the world as goodwill ambassadors. they were the vietnam in 1953, 53 nations, because he believed in person to person diplomacy, and my father liked that.
that same kind of factionalizing in 2008 in the primary when barack obama was pitted against hillary rodham clinton. they're both in some sense on the same side. people who were displeased with both of them wanted to see them as adversaries and in certain senses they were. so it's complicated and ongoing, and i think it is in every culture, bill the way. i think that -- it's certainly part of our legacy but citizenship is constantly -- france, other places, constantsly being reinvestigated. sorry to go on. thank you. >> could you discuss the role or lack thereof, among political opponents of compromise during the times you looked at, and how it relates to today, to political factions you see compromised equivalent to treason. >> i think that's for you. the subtitle of my book is "confidence, crisis and compromise." and one of the white motifs, one of the themes that goes through the book, is the issue of compromise, because not only do we hear about the compromise of 1820, 1850, but the actual word was constantly being ban died about and you have people shouting in the senate, or in the hou
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